Episode 4: Designing Happiness. How to snag your project

Featured

Snagging Expert; Siobhon Niles

This week we talk to construction professional Siobhon Niles about the final stage of a project; The ‘Test It’ stage where you, your architect or your project manager will snag the work done by your contractor and sub contractors.

Siobhon has worked on building sites for over a decade but doesn’t hide the honest truth that if you don’t give the test it and snagging stage sufficient time, you are at a loss.

Why daylight is important

She talked about daylight being the most critical light there is. So you have to plan this in, if you need to wait until Saturday until you have the time to snag during the day, then make sure you plan this in.

Siobhon talks about acclimatisation, lots and lots of materials (we talked about vinyl flooring) needs time to settle in the environment it is going to be used.  If it is installed straight away there can be folds or creases in the installed product which you will identify during the snagging stage – so you can be creating a defect.

Its all in the planning

As mentioned by our expert Quantity Surveyor in the buy it stage podcast here, the programme is everything, so snagging is built in as the programme goes along and any acclimatisation is planned in too.  So snagging is not done ONLY right at the end, it’s part of the build process.  

‘The key is continuous snagging throughout the build, to each stage in the programme.’

Siobhon Niles, construction project manager

The importance of samples

Siobhon talks about how to use samples – having a physical example of what you are buying so you can test this against the finished installed product.  This helps take the emotion out of a snagging discussion as you can hold the sample up to the element which has been installed and it either matches or it doesn’t!

Remember your specification

Siobhon also talks about the importance of having in place a performance specification (which would be covered in the design it stage where the specification is created) as you might think at the test it stage that an electrical or mechanical item isn’t right- you can go back to the spec to confirm what’s right and wrong. 

Communication is key

Communication with the builder / contractor is best in a list – with a photo.  Siobhon likes spreadsheets as it keeps all the comments in one place, a photo can be associated with the comment and (most importantly) the builder won’t get overwhelmed by 50 different messages over the course of multiple days.  Its far better to collate all comments and send them over for each area or product being snagged and then allow the time for those comments to be digested and responded to.  That time to capture items, send them and the time to respond should all be planned in the programme.

Siobhon recommends taking a steer from your contractor on any specific software or apps for snagging.  As there is a learning curve of how to use the software and your contractors time is best used on doing what they do best, your extension or refurb.  If you love a piece of particular software please ensure you include this requirement in your specification and design pack when you tender.  You can then find a contractor who will accept this from the start.

It is an emotional stage!

Finally Siobhon recognises how emotional this stage is, when you are tired and just want to move back in or simply get the builder out.  She recommends to take your time, not to rush and to remember that your contractor wants to do a good job and for you to be an ambassador for them.

For more information

For more information on this podcast and other episodes please visit www.DesigningHappiness.org and follow us on Instagram @EDDPodcast and Twitter @eddpodcast

If you have enjoyed this episode please rate, review and subscribe as it helps other home owners design their happiness.

Episode 3: Designing Happiness; Commissioning an outdoor sculpture.

Featured

with celebrity sculptor Paul Vanstone

This week we talk to Paul Vanstone about the process of preparing for, planning and commission outdoor art.  As a veteran marble sculptor who sells and installs his pieces globally – Paul has lots of advice to dispense.  

We recorded this podcast at his atelier so thanks for understanding about some of the background noise.

Advice

Paul gives us great advice about the confidence and trust in the artist to commission a piece.  He gives us examples of the process he goes through with clients and encourages the listeners to be involved in the process.

The three top tips for putting a sculpture outdoors are:

1) Selection of the space / Location – he uses different size cardboard cut outs (which he calls his Monty Python process) to try the pieces in different locations.  the different size pieces help to get the scale correct.

2) Ground work / base preparation – make the supportive ground structure bigger than the base of the piece.  When it finally comes in you might find it looks better a couple of feet to the left.  The additional footings are minimal in cost to give you that ability to adjust.

3) Plan the sculpture in conjunction with your gardener / landscape architect so the two work together -the sculpture should be put in when the garden is ready, which might be well before the plants go in, or at the point of landscaping because this is the best access moment. 

How to commission.

Paul talks about how to commission something new – if the exact piece you want isn’t available or you want something bespoke, the timescales for doing this and the communication during this process.

Budget.

And finally we talk about budget – how you think about and talk about the cost of art.  This isn’t a comfortable conversation for everyone, but Paul is very honest about how and when you have those conversations and how the artist might be able to help you tweak the piece, it’s size or base material, to help bring the sculpture into your budget.

Contact. 

Paul can be contacted via his website https://www.paulvanstone.co.uk or on instagram @Paulvanstonesculptures

For more information on this podcast and other episodes please visit www.DesigningHappiness.org

If you have enjoyed this episode please rate, review and subscribe as it helps other home owners design their happiness. 

Episode 2: Designing Happiness. Architect vs Contractor vs Builder – a guide.

What is the different between Architect, Contractor and Builder; and what do they bring to your project?

We cover the difference in the different jobs:

  • Architect,
  • Contractor and
  • Builder,

when there is cross over and what you get from each of them.

Legal elements of your project

We discussed the importance of legal Party Wall agreements; more information can be found on the UK Government website  https://www.gov.uk/party-walls-building-works   and look out for our future podcast with a legal expert on this and other potential property dispute matters!

Project Research Stage

We talk about help architects can offer at the research stage, but advised us to use your local authority planning portal to look at local planning and building regulation advice and also to see what has been approved and rejected locally.

How much does this cost?

Brigitte was very open about the way she charges.  If you are interested in finding an architect for your project, take Brigitte’s advice and ask for recommendations.  If you can’t find anyone locally check the RIBA website https://www.architecture.com/find-an-architect/ for registered architects in your area.  But go with someone you like and who you feel understands you and your project, As Brigitte says – “building work in an emotional endeavour!” 

Pinterest again came up as a favourite repository for research and inspirational ideas, but we also received the advice to take a photo of something you like – even if it isn’t something you specifically want in your home – it helps your construction professionals understand you and your project.

And finally – we got some great advice: “If you think a professional is expensive, wait until you find out how much an amateur costs you!”

Brigitte Clements – Loki Architecture

Contact

Brigitte can be contacted through her practice website https://www.loki-architecture.comand she is also on LinkedIn under Brigitte Clements and on Instagram as https://www.instagram.com/loki_architecture/

Episode 1: Designing Happiness, 5 steps to remodelling your home

The 5 steps of a home renovation or extension project – how the professional do it.

Are you thinking about extending or renovating your home?  

Undertaken projects before and not got what you wanted?

Been disappointed or frustrated by the design and construction process?

Want to know the tricks of the trade?

Do you want to make sure the end product is perfect for your lifestyle, personality and taste?

In this weeks podcast, Designing Happiness host and Technical Design Expert, Abigail Hall, takes you through the 5 easy stages.

They are:

  • Plan it
  • Design it
  • Buy it
  • Build it
  • Test it.

Listen to the episode to find out what deliverable you should have at the end of each section and subscribe for future episodes where Abigail talks to industry professionals about how to get the most out of each stage.  

If you have any questions please email Designing Happiness and please subscribe so you don’t miss an episode. 

The Test it stage – How to snag your project

This week we talk to construction professional Siobhon Niles about the final stage of a project; The ‘Test It’ stage where you, your architect or your project manager will snag the work done by your contractor and sub contractors.

Siobhon has worked on building sites for over a decade but doesn’t hide the honest truth that if you don’t give the test it and snagging stage sufficient time, you are at a loss.

She talked about daylight being the most critical light there is. So you have to plan this in, if you need to wait until Saturday until you have the time to snag during the day, then make sure you plan this in.

Siobhon talks about acclimatisation, lots and lots of materials (we talked about vinyl flooring) needs time to settle in the environment it is going to be used.  If it is installed straight away there can be folds or creases in the installed product which you will identify during the snagging stage – so you can be creating a defect.

As mentioned by our expert Quantity Surveyor in the buy it stage podcast here, the programme is everything, so snagging is built in as the programme goes along and any acclimatisation is planned in too.  So snagging is not done ONLY right at the end, it’s part of the build process.  

‘The key is continuous snagging throughout the build, to each stage in the programme.’

Siobhon talks about how to use samples – having a physical example of what you are buying so you can test this against the finished installed product.  This helps take the emotion out of a snagging discussion as you can hold the sample up to the element which has been installed and it either matches or it doesn’t!

Siobhon also talks about the importance of having in place a performance specification (which would be covered in the design it stage where the specification is created) as you might think at the test it stage that an electrical or mechanical item isn’t right- you can go back to the spec to confirm what’s right and wrong. 

Communication with the builder / contractor is best in a list – with a photo.  Siobhon likes spreadsheets as it keeps all the comments in one place, a photo can be associated with the comment and (most importantly) the builder won’t get overwhelmed by 50 different messages over the course of multiple days.  Its far better to collate all comments and send them over for each area or product being snagged and then allow the time for those comments to be digested and responded to.  That time to capture items, send them and the time to respond should all be planned in the programme.

Siobhon recommends taking a steer from your contractor on any specific software or apps for snagging.  As there is a learning curve of how to use the software and your contractors time is best used on doing what they do best, your extension or refurb.  If you love a piece of particular software please ensure you include this requirement in your specification and design pack when you tender.  You can then find a contractor who will accept this from the start.

Finally Siobhon recognises how emotional this stage is, when you are tired and just want to move back in or simply get the builder out.  She recommends to take your time, not to rush and to remember that your contractor wants to do a good job and for you to be an ambassador for them.

For more information on this podcast and other episodes please visit www.EDDPodcast.com and follow us on Instagram @EDDPodcast and Twitter @eddpodcast

If you have enjoyed this episode please rate, review and subscribe as it helps other home owners design their happiness.

What’s a Quantity Surveyor & how to Value Engineer your project.

This week we talked to the seasoned Quantity Surveyor Millie Lucas about the role of a QS in a renovation or extension project and what lessons we can learn from her years in the construction industry.

We start by learning that we are all capable of making minor omissions in the project but they can have expensive consequences!  The devil is in the detail and never take something just on word alone.

Millie describes how the Quantity Surveyor is the ‘purse strings’ of a project and they are obligated to work to get the best value for their client during the ‘Buy It’ Stage. (see here for a link to a short podcast on the 5 stages of a home renovation or extension project).

We go through the reasonable level of information to receive from your contractors Quantity Surveyor and Millie reminds us if there is no programme then it is likely that the costs have not been calculated accurately. 

We discuss the use of Gumtree, Freecycle and NextDoor to sell ‘left over’ materials, but we also talk about how to avoid this in the first place!

Millie spills her secrets on getting the best price through shopping around, going straight to the manufacturer and if possible getting your contractor to purchase it, as they might well have much stronger buying power than you.  And watch out for those fancy showrooms as that fancy thick brochure and free drinks are being added onto the cost of your product!

We cover What Value Engineering is, which is an elegant way of saying cost saving.  Millie tells us there are 3 fundamental ways to Value Engineer: assess if there is a better cost method of installing the item, a different and lower priced product or a reduction in the finish to a cheaper specification.

BUT Millie reminds us that we need to have conversations with the people we are doing the project, your partner or other home users.  The value engineer options are easy to come up with but, unless you know what each uses ‘need to and nice to’s’ are for the home design, you might cut something which you later lead to regret. We are trying to design happiness, not anger and animosity!

And remember, if you find that the project value is simply more than you can afford, even after value engineering, it isn’t that your dream won’t happen, it is just postponed until you can save the funds.

To find an independent QS please visit the professional bodies RICS and CIOB, if in doubt call up and have a chat about your project.

If you have enjoyed this episode please rate, review and subscribe as it helps other home owners design their happiness.